Saturday, November 8, 2008

Its (Y)our Life :)


This piece of writing out here took me what I would say, a lifetime in experience to explain out. Probably the best way to put it would be that I took a lifetime to realise it ( what a dumber! )

There are millions of people you come across all your life- at work, study, on the roads, or be it anywhere you are. Chances are that you may not remember 99.99% even if you see them again. The remaining 0.01% ( or even less than that if people are shy-natured ) keeps changing as you pass through different stages of life.

You go to kindergarten, make friends there - and before you know to link the name with the person you're out of it. With it goes your memory of the people there ( there might be exceptions here , take me for instance - I still remember two people from my kindergarten!! But that I would reject as a highly insignificant number) Next up comes schooling where you get to grow as you learn, and make friends with all sorts of people. The uniqueness of schooling lies in the fact that you get to gel as a unit- you identify who's who as your age has crossed that level at which you could not remember things. Day in day out, you spend eight hours in class and other events in the school. For people changing schools often, they would have experienced how different each school and the students in it are. They would know how the people in the life changed as they changed schools and got to know new individuals. School grows into college where a completely new set of comrades take over as your "buddies" and "best friends" - invariably this is where one would find his/her best friends and wellwishers who would swear by him/her. ( I'm trying to imply that i'm not gender-biased ;) ) At this age I would say you are best equipped to choose the friends you want to, and actually decide whom you want to keep in life. Boyfriends/Girlfriends normally happen at this stage, and invariably with that clause comes breakups as an add-on. Wondering why I'm beating so much around the bush? Well all these factors point to the truth that the people in your life keep changing as life takes you places. Noone is permanent, the exeunt in the play can happen anytime. I just pointed out a few key exit points in the transitions from kindergarten to school and to college. What do you do when you realise noone is permanently embossed in the pattern of your life , and ultimately it is just going to be YOU and YOU alone who would be left?

At this stage, the pessimist would say - Since noone is permanent in your life, why make friends at all ?

The optimist would say - Since you know that noone is going to be around for you all your life, take your chances- have fun, optimize on every opportunity to be around for them- and most importantly, LIVE YOUR LIFE. Live this moment, and this second as though it is the last time they would be there with you.

Whether you choose to be the pessimist or optimist, lies in your hands.

11 comments:

sweth said...

very true, sree.... very true...... :-) nice piece of writin...

kasi said...

Good one sree... i have around 10 kinder garden friends still close and around me... the important ppl ll stay in ur life for ever if u happen to find 2 quality minutes for them....

Srivaths said...

I know you're not gender biased :D

Anonymous said...

i agree to the above person's comment....

Shreenath said...

Typical srivatrisha.Leaving everything and commenting on the most insignificant part of the post. :P

Anonymous said...

your orientation doesn't seem straight at all.... comment 3 was apt....

Srivaths said...

Hey hey, seems my comments have received more support than yours....

srividya said...

well said...friends play an important role in one's life....

Sat said...

@shreenath: my sympathies with you for receiving comments from our very own fav roomie :P

Srivaths said...

Be an optimist... Live your life as though it will be the the last time you are with them. Which sometimes, i fear might literally be the case for me :)

Sat said...

one year since ...and u two roomies still share the mutual spark (literally, it seems :-))